Database Systems: Pearson New International Edition

The Complete Book
2e édition

VitalSource eBook (VitalBook) - En anglais 49,00 € DRM

Spécifications


Éditeur
Pearson Education
Édition
2
Auteur
Hector Garcia-Molina, Jennifer Widom, Jeffrey Ullman,
Langue
anglais
BISAC Subject Heading
COM021000 COMPUTERS / Databases > COM084010 COMPUTERS / Desktop Applications / Databases
BIC subject category (UK)
UN Databases > UNS Database software
Code publique Onix
05 College/higher education
Date de première publication du titre
01 novembre 2013
Subject Scheme Identifier Code
Classification thématique Thema: Bases de données
Classification thématique Thema: Logiciel de base de données

VitalSource eBook


Date de publication
01 novembre 2013
ISBN-13
9781292037301
Ampleur
Nombre de pages de contenu principal : 1152
Code interne
129203730X
Protection technique e-livre
DRM

Google Livres Aperçu


Publier un commentaire sur cet ouvrage

Sommaire


 TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

1 The Worlds of Database Systems

   1.1 The Evolution of Database Systems

   1.1.1 Early Database Management Systems

   1.1.2 Relational Database Systems

   1.1.3 Smaller and Smaller Systems

   1.1.4 Bigger and Bigger Systems

   1.1.5 Information Integration

   1.2 Overview of a Database Management System

   1.2.1 Data-Definition Language Commands

   1.2.2 Overview of Query Processing

   1.2.3 Storage and Buffer Management

   1.2.4 Transaction Processing

   1.2.5 The Query Processor

   1.3 Outline of Database-System Studies

   1.4 References for Chapter 1

 

PART I: Relational Database Modeling

 

2 The Relational Model of Data

   2.1 An Overview of Data Models

   2.1.1 What is a Data Model?

   2.1.2 Important Data Models

   2.1.3 The Relational Model in Brief

   2.1.4 The Semistructured Model in Brief

   2.1.5 Other Data Models

   2.1.6 Comparison of Modeling Approaches

   2.2 Basics of the Relational Model

   2.2.1 Attributes

   2.2.2 Schemas

   2.2.3 Tuples

   2.2.4 Domains

   2.2.5 Equivalent Representations of a Relation

   2.2.6 Relation Instances

   2.2.7 Keys of Relations

   2.2.8 An Example Database Schema

   2.2.9 Exercises for Section 2.2

   2.3 Defining a Relation Schema in SQL

   2.3.1 Relations in SQL

   2.3.2 Data Types

   2.3.3 Simple Table Declarations

   2.3.4 Modifying Relation Schemas

   2.3.5 Default Values

   2.3.6 Declaring Keys

   2.3.7 Exercises for Section 2.3

   2.4 An Algebraic Query Language

   2.4.1 Why Do We Need a Special Query Language?

   2.4.2 What is an Algebra?

   2.4.3 Overview of Relational Algebra

   2.4.4 Set Operations on Relations

   2.4.5 Projection

   2.4.6 Selection

   2.4.7 Cartesian Product

   2.4.8 Natural Joins

   2.4.9 Theta-Joins

   2.4.10 Combining Operations to Form Queries

   2.4.11 Naming and Renaming

   2.4.12 Relationships Among Operations

   2.4.13 A Linear Notation for Algebraic Expressions

   2.4.14 Exercises for Section 2.4

   2.5 Constraints on Relations

   2.5.1 Relational Algebra as a Constraint Language

   2.5.2 Referential Integrity Constraints

   2.5.3 Key Constraints

   2.5.4 Additional Constraint Examples

   2.5.5 Exercises for Section 2.5

   2.6 Summary of Chapter 2

   2.7 References for Chapter 2

3 Design Theory for Relational Databases

   3.1 Functional Dependencies

   3.1.1 Definition of Functional Dependency

   3.1.2 Keys of Relations

   3.1.3 Superkeys

   3.1.4 Exercises for Section 3.1

   3.2 Rules About Functional Dependencies

   3.2.1 Reasoning About Functional Dependencies

   3.2.2 The Splitting/Combining Rule

   3.2.3 Trivial Functional Dependencies

   3.2.4 Computing the Closure of Attributes

   3.2.5 Why the Closure Algorithm Works

   3.2.6 The Transitive Rule

   3.2.7 Closing Sets of Functional Dependencies

   3.2.8 Projecting Functional Dependencies

   3.2.9 Exercises for Section 3.2

   3.3 Design of Relational Database Schemas

   3.3.1 Anomalies

   3.3.2 Decomposing Relations

   3.3.3 Boyce-Codd Normal Form

   3.3.4 Decomposition into BCNF

   3.3.5 Exercises for Section 3.3

   3.4 Decomposition: The Good, Bad, and Ugly

   3.4.1 Recovering Information from a Decomposition

   3.4.2 The Chase Test for Lossless Join

   3.4.3 Why the Chase Works

   3.4.4 Dependency Preservation

   3.4.5 Exercises for Section 3.4

   3.5 Third Normal Form

   3.5.1 Definition of Third Normal Form

   3.5.2 The Synthesis Algorithm for 3NF Schemas

   3.5.3 Why the 3NF Synthesis Algorithm Works

   3.5.4 Exercises for Section 3.5

   3.6 Multivalued Dependencies

   3.6.1 Attribute Independence and Its Consequent Redundancy

   3.6.2 Definition of Multivalued Dependencies

   3.6.3 Reasoning About Multivalued Dependencies

   3.6.4 Fourth Normal Form

   3.6.5 Decomposition into Fourth Normal Form

   3.6.6 Relationships Among Normal Forms

   3.6.7 Exercises for Section 3.6

   3.7 An Algorithm for Discovering MVD's

   3.7.1 The Closure and the Chase

   3.7.2 Extending the Chase to MVD's

   3.7.3 Why the Chase Works for MVD's

   3.7.4 Projecting MVD's

   3.7.5 Exercises for Section 3.7

   3.8 Summary of Chapter 3

   3.9 References for Chapter 3

4 High-Level Database Models

   4.1 The Entity/Relationship Model

   4.1.1 Entity Sets

   4.1.2 Attributes

   4.1.3 Relationships

   4.1.4 Entity-Relationship Diagrams

   4.1.5 Instances of an E/R Diagram

   4.1.6 Multiplicity of Binary E/R Relationships

   4.1.7 Multiway Relationships

   4.1.8 Roles in Relationships

   4.1.9 Attributes on Relationships

   4.1.10 Converting Multiway Relationships to Binary

   4.1.11 Subclasses in the E/R Model

   4.1.12 Exercises for Section 4.1

   4.2 Design Principles

   4.2.1 Faithfulness

   4.2.2 Avoiding Redundancy

   4.2.3 Simplicity Counts

   4.2.4 Choosing the Right Relationships

   4.2.5 Picking the Right Kind of Element

   4.2.6 Exercises for Section 4.2

   4.3 Constraints in the E/R Model

   4.3.1 Keys in the E/R Model

   4.3.2 Representing Keys in the E/R Model

   4.3.3 Referential Integrity

   4.3.4 Degree Constraints

   4.3.5 Exercises for Section 4.3

   4.4 Weak Entity Sets

   4.4.1 Causes of Weak Entity Sets

   4.4.2 Requirements for Weak Entity Sets

   4.4.3 Weak Entity Set Notation

   4.4.4 Exercises for Section 4.4

   4.5 From E/R Diagrams to Relational Designs

   4.5.1 From Entity Sets to Relations

   4.5.2 From E/R Relationships to Relations

   4.5.3 Combining Relations

   4.5.4 Handling Weak Entity Sets

   4.5.5 Exercises for Section 4.5

   4.6 Converting Subclass Structures to Relations

   4.6.1 E/R-Style Conversion

   4.6.2 An Object-Oriented Approach

   4.6.3 Using Null Values to Combine Relations

   4.6.4 Comparison of Approaches

   4.6.5 Exercises for Section 4.6

   4.7 Unified Modeling Language

   4.7.1 UML Classes

   4.7.2 Keys for UML classes

   4.7.3 Associations

   4.7.4 Self-Associations

   4.7.5 Association Classes

   4.7.6 Subclasses in UML

   4.7.7 Aggregations and Compositions

   4.7.8 Exercises for Section 4.7

   4.8 From UML Diagrams to Relations

   4.8.1 UML-to-Relations Basics

   4.8.2 From UML Subclasses to Relations

   4.8.3 From Aggregations and Compositions to Relations

   4.8.4 The UML Analog of Weak Entity Sets

   4.8.5 Exercises for Section 4.8

   4.9 Object Definition Language

   4.9.1 Class Declarations

   4.9.2 Attributes in ODL

   4.9.3 Relationships in ODL

   4.9.4 Inverse Relationships

   4.9.5 Multiplicity of Relationships

   4.9.6 Types in ODL

   4.9.7 Subclasses in ODL

   4.9.8 Declaring Keys in ODL

   4.9.9 Exercises for Section 4.9

   4.10 From ODL Designs to Relational Designs

   4.10.1 From ODL Classes to Relations

   4.10.2 Complex Attributes in Classes

   4.10.3 Representing Set-Valued Attributes

   4.10.4 Representing Other Type Constructors

   4.10.5 Representing ODL Relationships

   4.10.6 Exercises for Section 4.10

   4.11 Summary of Chapter 4

   4.12 References for Chapter 4

 

PART II: Relational Database Programming

 

5 Algebraic and Logical Query Languages

   5.1 Relational Operations on Bags

   5.1.1 Why Bags?

   5.1.2 Union, Intersection, and Difference of Bags

   5.1.3 Projection of Bags

   5.1.4 Selection on Bags

   5.1.5 Product of Bags

   5.1.6 Joins of Bags

   5.1.7 Exercises for Section 5.1

   5.2 Extended Operators of Relational Algebra

   5.2.1 Duplicate Elimination

   5.2.2 Aggregation Operators

   5.2.3 Grouping

   5.2.4 The Grouping Operator

   5.2.5 Extending the Projection Operator

   5.2.6 The Sorting Operator

   5.2.7 Outerjoins

   5.2.8 Exercises for Section 5.2

   5.3 A Logic for Relations

   5.3.1 Predicates and Atoms

   5.3.2 Arithmetic Atoms

   5.3.3 Datalog Rules and Queries

   5.3.4 Meaning of Datalog Rules

   5.3.5 Extensional and Intensional Predicates

   5.3.6 Datalog Rules Applied to Bags

   5.3.7 Exercises for Section 5.3

   5.4 Relational Algebra and Datalog

   5.4.1 Boolean Operations

   5.4.2 Projection

   5.4.3 Selection

   5.4.4 Product

   5.4.5 Joins

   5.4.6 Simulating Multiple Operations with Datalog

   5.4.7 Comparison Between Datalog and Relational Algebra

   5.4.8 Exercises for Section 5.4

   5.5 Summary of Chapter 5

   5.6 References for Chapter 5

6 The Database Language SQL

   6.1 Simple Queries in SQL

   6.1.1 Projection in SQL

   6.1.2 Selection in SQL

   6.1.3 Comparison of Strings

   6.1.4 Pattern Matching in SQL

   6.1.5 Dates and Times

   6.1.6 Null Values and Comparisons Involving {\tt NULL}

   6.1.7 The Truth-Value {\tt UNKNOWN}

   6.1.8 Ordering the Output

   6.1.9 Exercises for Section 6.1

   6.2 Queries Involving More Than One Relation

   6.2.1 Products and Joins in SQL

   6.2.2 Disambiguating Attributes

   6.2.3 Tuple Variables

   6.2.4 Interpreting Multirelation Queries

   6.2.5 Union, Intersection, and Difference of Queries

   6.2.6 Exercises for Section 6.2

   6.3 Subqueries

   6.3.1 Subqueries that Produce Scalar Values

   6.3.2 Conditions Involving Relations

   6.3.3 Conditions Involving Tuples

   6.3.4 Correlated Subqueries

   6.3.5 Subqueries in {\tt FROM}\ Clauses

   6.3.6 SQL Join Expressions

   6.3.7 Natural Joins

   6.3.8 Outerjoins

   6.3.9 Exercises for Section 6.3

   6.4 Full-Relation Operations

   6.4.1 Eliminating Duplicates

   6.4.2 Duplicates in Unions, Intersections, and Differences

      6.4.3 Grouping and Aggregation in SQL

   6.4.4 Aggregation Operators

   6.4.5 Grouping

   6.4.6 Grouping, Aggregation, and Nulls

   6.4.7 {\tt HAVING} Clauses

   6.4.8 Exercises for Section 6.4

   6.5 Database Modifications

   6.5.1 Insertion

   6.5.2 Deletion

   6.5.3 Updates

   6.5.4 Exercises for Section 6.5

   6.6 Transactions in SQL

   6.6.1 Serializability

   6.6.2 Atomicity

   6.6.3 Transactions

   6.6.4 Read-Only Transactions

   6.6.5 Dirty Reads

   6.6.6 Other Isolation Levels

   6.6.7 Exercises for Section 6.6

   6.7 Summary of Chapter 6

   6.8 References for Chapter 6

7 Constraints and Triggers

   7.1 Keys and Foreign Keys

   7.1.1 Declaring Foreign-Key Constraints

   7.1.2 Maintaining Referential Integrity

   7.1.3 Deferred Checking of Constraints

   7.1.4 Exercises for Section 7.1

   7.2 Constraints on Attributes and Tuples

   7.2.1 Not-Null Constraints

   7.2.2 Attribute-Based {\tt CHECK} Constraints

   7.2.3 Tuple-Based {\tt CHECK} Constraints

   7.2.4 Comparison of Tuple- and Attribute-Based Constraints

   7.2.5 Exercises for Section 7.2

   7.3 Modification of Constraints

   7.3.1 Giving Names to Constraints

   7.3.2 Altering Constraints on Tables

   7.3.3 Exercises for Section 7.3

   7.4 Assertions

   7.4.1 Creating Assertions

   7.4.2 Using Assertions

   7.4.3 Exercises for Section 7.4

   7.5 Triggers

   7.5.1 Triggers in SQL

   7.5.2 The Options for Trigger Design

   7.5.3 Exercises for Section 7.5

   7.6 Summary of Chapter 7

   7.7 References for Chapter 7

8 Views and Indexes

   8.1 Virtual Views

   8.1.1 Declaring Views

   8.1.2 Querying Views

   8.1.3 Renaming Attributes

   8.1.4 Exercises for Section 8.1

   8.2 Modifying Views

   8.2.1 View Removal

   8.2.2 Updatable Views

   8.2.3 Instead-Of Triggers on Views

   8.2.4 Exercises for Section 8.2

   8.3 Indexes in SQL

   8.3.1 Motivation for Indexes

   8.3.2 Declaring Indexes

   8.3.3 Exercises for Section 8.3

   8.4 Selection of Indexes

   8.4.1 A Simple Cost Model

   8.4.2 Some Useful Indexes

   8.4.3 Calculating the Best Indexes to Create

   8.4.4 Automatic Selection of Indexes to Create

   8.4.5 Exercises for Section 8.4

   8.5 Materialized Views

   8.5.1 Maintaining a Materialized View

   8.5.2 Periodic Maintenance of Materialized Views

   8.5.3 Rewriting Queries to Use Materialized Views

   8.5.4 Automatic Creation of Materialized Views

   8.5.5 Exercises for Section 8.5

   8.6 Summary of Chapter 8

   8.7 References for Chapter 8

9 SQL in a Server Environment

   9.1 The Three-Tier Architecture

   9.1.1 The Web-Server Tier

   9.1.2 The Application Tier

   9.1.3 The Database Tier

   9.2 The SQL Environment

      9.2.1 Environments

   9.2.2 Schemas

   9.2.3 Catalogs

   9.2.4 Clients and Servers in the SQL Environment

   9.2.5 Connections

   9.2.6 Sessions

   9.2.7 Modules

   9.3 The SQL/Host-Language Interface

   9.3.1 The Impedance Mismatch Problem

   9.3.2 Connecting SQL to the Host Language

   9.3.3 The {\tt DECLARE} Section

   9.3.4 Using Shared Variables

   9.3.5 Single-Row Select Statements

   9.3.6 Cursors

   9.3.7 Modifications by Cursor

   9.3.8 Protecting Against Concurrent Updates

   9.3.9 Dynamic SQL

   9.3.10 Exercises for Section 9.3

   9.4 Stored Procedures

   9.4.1 Creating PSM Functions and Procedures

   9.4.2 Some Simple Statement Forms in PSM

   9.4.3 Branching Statements

   9.4.4 Queries in PSM

   9.4.5 Loops in PSM

   9.4.6 For-Loops

   9.4.7 Exceptions in PSM

   9.4.8 Using PSM Functions and Procedures

   9.4.9 Exercises for Section 9.4

   9.5 Using a Call-Level Interface

   9.5.1 Introduction to SQL/CLI

   9.5.2 Processing Statements

   9.5.3 Fetching Data From a Query Result

   9.5.4 Passing Parameters to Queries

   9.5.5 Exercises for Section 9.5

   9.6 JDBC

   9.6.1 Introduction to JDBC

   9.6.2 Creating Statements in JDBC

   9.6.3 Cursor Operations in JDBC

   9.6.4 Parameter Passing

   9.6.5 Exercises for Section 9.6

   9.7 PHP

   9.7.1 PHP Basics

   9.7.2 Arrays

   9.7.3 The PEAR DB Library

   9.7.4 Creating a Database Connection Using DB

   9.7.5 Executing SQL Statements

   9.7.6 Cursor Operations in PHP

   9.7.7 Dynamic SQL in PHP

   9.7.8 Exercises for Section 9.7

   9.8 Summary of Chapter 9

   9.9 References for Chapter 9

10 Advanced Topics in Relational Databases

   10.1 Security and User Authorization in SQL

   10.1.1 Privileges

   10.1.2 Creating Privileges

   10.1.3 The Privilege-Checking Process

   10.1.4 Granting Privileges

   10.1.5 Grant Diagrams

   10.1.6 Revoking Privileges

   10.1.7 Exercises for Section 10.1

   10.2 Recursion in SQL

   10.2.1 Defining Recursive Relations in SQL

   10.2.2 Problematic Expressions in Recursive SQL

   10.2.3 Exercises for Section 10.2

   10.3 The Object-Relational Model

   10.3.1 From Relations to Object-Relations

   10.3.2 Nested Relations

   10.3.3 References

   10.3.4 Object-Oriented Versus Object-Relational

   10.3.5 Exercises for Section 10.3

   10.4 User-Defined Types in SQL

   10.4.1 Defining Types in SQL

   10.4.2 Method Declarations in UDT's

   10.4.3 Method Definitions

   10.4.4 Declaring Relations with a UDT

   10.4.5 References

   10.4.6 Creating Object ID's for Tables

   10.4.7 Exercises for Section 10.4

   10.5 Operations on Object-Relational Data

   10.5.1 Following References

   10.5.2 Accessing Components of Tuples with a UDT

   10.5.3 Generator and Mutator Functions

   10.5.4 Ordering Relationships on UDT's

   10.5.5 Exercises for Section 10.5

   10.6 On-Line Analytic Processing

   10.6.1 OLAP and Data Warehouses

   10.6.2 OLAP Applications

   10.6.3 A Multidimensional View of OLAP Data

   10.6.4 Star Schemas

   10.6.5 Slicing and Dicing

   10.6.6 Exercises for Section 10.6

   10.7 Data Cubes

   10.7.1 The Cube Operator

   10.7.2 The Cube Operator in SQL

   10.7.3 Exercises for Section 10.7

   10.8 Summary of Chapter 10

   10.9 References for Chapter 10

 

PART III: Modeling and Programming for Semistructured Data

 

11 The Semistructured-Data Model

   11.1 Semistructured Data

   11.1.1 Motivation for the Semistructured-Data Model

   11.1.2 Semistructured Data Representation

   11.1.3 Information Integration Via Semistructured Data

   11.1.4 Exercises for Section 11.1

   11.2 XML

   11.2.1 Semantic Tags

   11.2.2 XML With and Without a Schema

   11.2.3 Well-Formed XML

   11.2.4 Attributes

   11.2.5 Attributes That Connect Elements

   11.2.6 Namespaces

   11.2.7 XML and Databases

   11.2.8 Exercises for Section 11.2

   11.3 Document Type Definitions

   11.3.1 The Form of a DTD

   11.3.2 Using a DTD

   11.3.3 Attribute Lists

   11.3.4 Identifiers and References

   11.3.5 Exercises for Section 11.3

   11.4 XML Schema

   11.4.1 The Form of an XML Schema

   11.4.2 Elements

   11.4.3 Complex Types

   11.4.4 Attributes

   11.4.5 Restricted Simple Types

   11.4.6 Keys in XML Schema

   11.4.7 Foreign Keys in XML Schema

   11.4.8 Exercises for Section 11.4

   11.5 Summary of Chapter 11

   11.6 References for Chapter 11

12 Programming Languages for XML

   12.1 XPath

   12.1.1 The XPath Data Model

   12.1.2 Document Nodes

   12.1.3 Path Expressions

   12.1.4 Relative Path Expressions

   12.1.5 Attributes in Path Expressions

   12.1.6 Axes

   12.1.7 Context of Expressions

   12.1.8 Wildcards

   12.1.9 Conditions in Path Expressions

   12.1.10 Exercises for Section 12.1

   12.2 XQuery

   12.2.1 XQuery Basics

   12.2.2 FLWR Expressions

   12.2.3 Replacement of Variables by Their Values

   12.2.4 Joins in XQuery

   12.2.5 XQuery Comparison Operators

   12.2.6 Elimination of Duplicates

   12.2.7 Quantification in XQuery

   12.2.8 Aggregations

   12.2.9 Branching in XQuery Expressions

   12.2.10 Ordering the Result of a Query

   12.2.11 Exercises for Section 12.2

   12.3 Extensible Stylesheet Language

   12.3.1 XSLT Basics

   12.3.2 Templates

   12.3.3 Obtaining Values From XML Data

   12.3.4 Recursive Use of Templates

   12.3.5 Iteration in XSLT

   12.3.6 Conditionals in XSLT

   12.3.7 Exercises for Section 12.3

   12.4 Summary of Chapter 12

   12.5 References for Chapter 12

 

PART IV: Database System Implementation

 

13 Secondary Storage Management

   13.1 The Memory Hierarchy

   13.1.1 The Memory Hierarchy

   13.1.2 Transfer of Data Between Levels

   13.1.3 Volatile and Nonvolatile Storage

   13.1.4 Virtual Memory

   13.1.5 Exercises for Section 13.1

   13.2 Disks

   13.2.1 Mechanics of Disks

   13.2.2 The Disk Controller

   13.2.3 Disk Access Characteristics

   13.2.4 Exercises for Section 13.2

   13.3 Accelerating Access to Secondary Storage

   13.3.1 The I/O Model of Computation

   13.3.2 Organizing Data by Cylinders

   13.3.3 Using Multiple Disks

   13.3.4 Mirroring Disks

   13.3.5 Disk Scheduling and the Elevator Algorithm

   13.3.6 Prefetching and Large-Scale Buffering

   13.3.7 Exercises for Section 13.3

   13.4 Disk Failures

   13.4.1 Intermittent Failures

   13.4.2 Checksums

   13.4.3 Stable Storage

   13.4.4 Error-Handling Capabilities of Stable Storage

   13.4.5 Recovery from Disk Crashes

   13.4.6 Mirroring as a Redundancy Technique

   13.4.7 Parity Blocks

   13.4.8 An Improvement: RAID 5

   13.4.9 Coping With Multiple Disk Crashes

   13.4.10 Exercises for Section 13.4

   13.5 Arranging Data on Disk

   13.5.1 Fixed-Length Records

   13.5.2 Packing Fixed-Length Records into Blocks

   13.5.3 Exercises for Section 13.5

   13.6 Representing Block and Record Addresses

   13.6.1 Addresses in Client-Server Systems

   13.6.2 Logical and Structured Addresses

   13.6.3 Pointer Swizzling

   13.6.4 Returning Blocks to Disk

   13.6.5 Pinned Records and Blocks

   13.6.6 Exercises for Section 13.6

   13.7 Variable-Length Data and Records

   13.7.1 Records With Variable-Length Fields

   13.7.2 Records With Repeating Fields

   13.7.3 Variable-Format Records

   13.7.4 Records That Do Not Fit in a Block

   13.7.5 BLOBs

   13.7.6 Column Stores

   13.7.7 Exercises for Section 13.7

   13.8 Record Modifications

   13.8.1 Insertion

   13.8.2 Deletion

   13.8.3 Update

   13.8.4 Exercises for Section 13.8

   13.9 Summary of Chapter 13

   13.10 References for Chapter 13

14 Index Structures

   14.1 Index-Structure Basics

   14.1.1 Sequential Files

   14.1.2 Dense Indexes

   14.1.3 Sparse Indexes

   14.1.4 Multiple Levels of Index

   14.1.5 Secondary Indexes

   14.1.6 Applications of Secondary Indexes

   14.1.7 Indirection in Secondary Indexes

   14.1.8 Document Retrieval and Inverted Indexes

   14.1.9 Exercises for Section 14.1

   14.2 B-Trees

   14.2.1 The Structure of B-trees

   14.2.2 Applications of B-trees

   14.2.3 Lookup in B-Trees

   14.2.4 Range Queries

   14.2.5 Insertion Into B-Trees

   14.2.6 Deletion From B-Trees

   14.2.7 Efficiency of B-Trees

   14.2.8 Exercises for Section 14.2

   14.3 Hash Tables

   14.3.1 Secondary-Storage Hash Tables

   14.3.2 Insertion Into a Hash Table

   14.3.3 Hash-Table Deletion

   14.3.4 Efficiency of Hash Table Indexes

   14.3.5 Extensible Hash Tables

   14.3.6 Insertion Into Extensible Hash Tables

   14.3.7 Linear Hash Tables

   14.3.8 Insertion Into Linear Hash Tables

   14.3.9 Exercises for Section 14.3

   14.4 Multidimensional Indexes

   14.4.1 Applications of Multidimensional Indexes

   14.4.2 Executing Range Queries Using Conventional Indexes

   14.4.3 Executing Nearest-Neighbor Queries Using Conventional Indexes

   14.4.4 Overview of Multidimensional Index Structures

   14.5 Hash Structures for Multidimensional Data

   14.5.1 Grid Files

   14.5.2 Lookup in a Grid File

   14.5.3 Insertion Into Grid Files

   14.5.4 Performance of Grid Files

   14.5.5 Partitioned Hash Functions

   14.5.6 Comparison of Grid Files and Partitioned Hashing

   14.5.7 Exercises for Section 14.5

   14.6 Tree Structures for Multidimensional Data

   14.6.1 Multiple-Key Indexes

   14.6.2 Performance of Multiple-Key Indexes

   14.6.3 $kd$-Trees

   14.6.4 Operations on $kd$-Trees

   14.6.5 Adapting $kd$-Trees to Secondary Storage

   14.6.6 Quad Trees

   14.6.7 R-Trees

   14.6.8 Operations on R-Trees

   14.6.9 Exercises for Section 14.6

   14.7 Bitmap Indexes

   14.7.1 Motivation for Bitmap Indexes

   14.7.2 Compressed Bitmaps

   14.7.3 Operating on Run-Length-Encoded Bit-Vectors

   14.7.4 Managing Bitmap Indexes

   14.7.5 Exercises for Section 14.7

   14.8 Summary of Chapter 14

   14.9 References for Chapter 14

15 Query Execution

   15.1 Introduction to Physical-Query-Plan Operators

   15.1.1 Scanning Tables

   15.1.2 Sorting While Scanning Tables

   15.1.3 The Computation Model for Physical Operators

   15.1.4 Parameters for Measuring Costs

   15.1.5 I/O Cost for Scan Operators

   15.1.6 Iterators for Implementation of Physical Operators

   15.2 One-Pass Algorithms

   15.2.1 One-Pass Algorithms for Tuple-at-a-Time Operations

   15.2.2 One-Pass Algorithms for Unary, Full-Relation Operations

   15.2.3 One-Pass Algorithms for Binary Operations

   15.2.4 Exercises for Section 15.2

   15.3 Nested-Loop Joins

   15.3.1 Tuple-Based Nested-Loop Join

   15.3.2 An Iterator for Tuple-Based Nested-Loop Join

   15.3.3 Block-Based Nested-Loop Join Algorithm

   15.3.4 Analysis of Nested-Loop Join

   15.3.5 Summary of Algorithms so Far

   15.3.6 Exercises for Section 15.3

   15.4 Two-Pass Algorithms Based on Sorting

   15.4.1 Two-Phase, Multiway Merge-Sort

   15.4.2 Duplicate Elimination Using Sorting

   15.4.3 Grouping and Aggregation Using Sorting

   15.4.4 A Sort-Based Un


Avez-vous une question à nous poser ?